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Guinness Nigeria appoints Mark Sandys to its Board as Non-Executive Director

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Guinness Nigeria Plc, on Monday announced the appointment of Mark Sandys to its Board as a Non-Executive Director effective 30th August 2017. Sandys, a long-serving executive of Diageo Plc with over 20 years’ experience has an MA degree in English and French from Balliol College, Oxford University in 1996. In the over 19 years he has been with Diageo, he has served as a Senior Marketing Executive in different capacities including as Global Marketing Strategy & Innovation Director Baileys, Marketing & Innovation Director, Diageo Russia & Eastern Europe (based in Moscow), Category Director, Whiskey & Reserve, Asia Pacific. He is currently the Global Head of Beer, Baileys & Smirnoff for Diageo and resides in Ireland.Powered by WPeMatico

Congolese art is recovering from its lowest days

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Worth a thousand words JOSEPH KINKONDA, one of the most famous artists in the Democratic Republic of Congo, lives in a dank bedroom in Ndjili, a scrubby neighbourhood of Kinshasa. At the end of his bed sits a plate with a few balls of paint wrapped in plastic. The air-conditioning unit is broken; a single bare light bulb hangs from the ceiling. Mr Kinkonda, who goes by his pen name of Chéri Chérin, seems as worn down as the surroundings. His legs are swollen; his belly barely covered by a shirt that is as dirty as it is shiny. Yet when he speaks, this miserable studio comes alive. “I was born with drawing,” he announces. “I did not learn it. I had it in my blood.” Born in 1955, he recounts how his father wanted him to become a priest and sent him to a Jesuit seminary. But sensing that h

War and dysfunctional politics threaten Iraq’s marshlands

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THE recovery of southern Iraq’s marshlands is arguably one of the great environmental triumphs of recent times. Reduced to dust and withered reeds when Saddam Hussein drained them to flush out rebels in the 1990s, the wetlands once again buzz with birds, dragonflies and the songs of buffalo-breeders, thanks to the devoted efforts of Iraqi conservationists. But the renewed symphony may be the marshes’ swan-song. A water crisis rooted in wasteful irrigation, climate change and dam-building is imperilling them again. A weakened flow into the Tigris and Euphrates rivers means that salt water from the Persian Gulf can now seep upstream into the marshes. This, coupled with farming run-off that has boosted salinity, again threatens wetland wildlife, vegetation and the local Marsh Arabs who hav

Donald Trump’s efforts to end a feud in the Gulf get nowhere

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THIS time Donald Trump seemed to back his braggadocio with results. On September 7th he met the ruler of Kuwait, who has tried to mediate the three-month feud between Qatar and his Gulf neighbours led by Saudi Arabia. Mr Trump suggested a new mediator: himself. “I think you’d have a deal worked out very quickly,” he said. The next day Qatar’s emir made a surprise phone call to the Saudi crown prince, their first known talk since the crisis began. But the rapprochement was fleeting. Hours after the call, Qatar’s state news agency said that Saudi Arabia had offered to appoint two envoys to negotiate a deal. But the Saudis were insulted. It was as if they had made the first concessions. Qatar’s report, they fumed, was a “distortion…of the facts.” Any further talks stalled. The call had mad

Egypt is making renewed efforts to reform its economy

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THE train north from Cairo winds through the lush fields and meandering canals of the Nile Delta, before chugging into Alexandria. The scenery is pleasant on a 180km journey that can drag on for more than four hours. It is slow enough that EgyptAir offers flights on the same route. Egypt’s state-owned, 6,700km rail network, the oldest in Africa, has seen better days. Stations are dingy; trains are dangerous and often delayed. In August 41 people were killed in one collision. It was the deadliest crash since 2012, but smaller ones are common, with over 1,200 last year alone. (Britain’s rail network, with three times as many passengers, saw about 750.) Days after the accident the transport minister said that he would bring in the private sector to improve quality and safety. His ministry