Month: July 2018

Why some countries are turning off the internet on exam days

african inspired, BUSINESS, News, Newspaper, NIGERIA, Nigerian News, Nigerian state programs, wazobia companies
AS LONG as there have been exams, students have found ways to cheat. Today the correct answers are just a few taps away on a smartphone. So countries have come up with new ways to stop the funny business. Some use metal detectors, surveillance cameras, mobile-phone jammers and even drones. Others have taken a more drastic step. Cheating in high-school leaving exams got so bad in Mauritania and Algeria that this year the authorities turned off the internet for the entire country. Algeria did so for at least an hour during tests (which last about a week); Mauritania cut access from morning until evening on exam days. Other countries, such as Iraq, Uzbekistan and Ethiopia, have for years been shutting down the internet during exam time. In each country students are under enormous pressure...

On the edge of the Sahara, people mourn the decline of people-smuggling

african inspired, BUSINESS, News, Newspaper, NIGERIA, Nigerian News, Nigerian state programs, wazobia companies
ON JUNE 14th the Sultan of Aïr, the traditional leader of the Touareg people of Agadez, came out to pray. It was a grand spectacle. Thousands had gathered to mark the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan at a huge open ground. When the Sultan had finished praying, he rode back to his palace, flanked by nobles on horseback and tootling trumpeters. In the streets everyone was smiling and waving. It must have been a relief for the Sultan: a few blessed hours of not having to listen to his subjects moaning about the collapse of the people-smuggling trade. For centuries Agadez, home to perhaps 200,000 people, has lived off trans-Saharan commerce. Once camel trains set off from here with slaves, pilgrims, salt and gold. More recently it has prospered from a boom in the traffic of people

Uganda’s politicised police force is not reducing crime

african inspired, BUSINESS, News, Newspaper, NIGERIA, Nigerian News, Nigerian state programs, wazobia companies
“STOP killing us!” chanted a crowd of several hundred people as they marched through Kampala on June 30th. Their protest has good cause. Last year the bodies of more than 20 women, many strangled and mutilated, were found after being dumped in two neighbourhoods close to the Ugandan capital. Scores more people have been kidnapped. “You never know, maybe I’m next,” says Shamim Masika, a student. Insecurity has become a hot political issue in Uganda. Newspapers have chronicled a wave of crime, from armed robberies to the murder of Muslim clerics. In June an MP was gunned down. Most startling of all was the murder last year of the police spokesman, who was shot in broad daylight outside his home. That case, like many others, remains unsolved. Yoweri Museveni, the president, has proposed s

Ceasefires in South Sudan seldom last

african inspired, BUSINESS, News, Newspaper, NIGERIA, Nigerian News, Nigerian state programs, wazobia companies
CEASEFIRES in South Sudan’s civil war tend to be short. At least nine such agreements have been signed since the war started in 2013. Only one has lasted longer than a month. The latest ceasefire, agreed to on June 30th, is already in danger of falling apart. On paper it sets the stage for power-sharing talks between President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar, a former vice-president. But hours after it took effect both sides reported violations. Analysts say Messrs Kiir and Machar have lost full control of their forces, which have splintered into factions. To make matters worse, Mr Kiir unveiled plans on July 2nd to extend his term by three years, to 2021. The opposition said the move would derail the peace talks.Powered by WPeMatico

Emmanuel Macron pays tribute to Fela Kuti, a Nigerian musician

african inspired, BUSINESS, News, Newspaper, NIGERIA, Nigerian News, Nigerian state programs, wazobia companies
Selfie-promotion THE old Afrika Shrine, a music venue in Lagos, the commercial capital of Nigeria, was burned down by soldiers in 1977. Its founder, the late Fela Kuti, a musical megastar, had called them “zombies” in a song. The soldiers beat Kuti badly and threw his mother from a first-floor window. But Kuti’s children, Yeni and Femi, rebuilt a nearby venue in 2000. Ever since, the New Afrika Shrine has attracted hip Nigerians and expats, including a young Emmanuel Macron, who once worked as an intern in the French embassy in Abuja. Mr Macron, now president of France, seems to have developed an attachment. When visiting Nigeria on July 3rd he went out of his way to visit the nightclub, known for its gyrating dancers and counterculture vibe. “What happens in the Shrine remains in the S

NGOs in Lebanon want to dig up mass graves from the civil war

african inspired, BUSINESS, News, Newspaper, NIGERIA, Nigerian News, Nigerian state programs, wazobia companies
LINA MAHFOUZ was six years old when Lebanon’s civil war began. She remembers hearing screams outside her bedroom window. One evening she saw a man in black carrying what looked like a dead body into the orange grove behind her home. “Years later I realised what they were doing. They were torturing and then burying people in the orchard,” she says. “The bodies are there.” It has been nearly 30 years since the civil war ended. But thousands of people are still missing. Most are probably dead: killed in Syrian prisons, dumped in the Mediterranean or buried in one of more than 100 mass graves dug by sectarian militias. The men who started the war also negotiated the peace, granting themselves amnesty for their crimes. Many are still in power. The government has had scant interest in digging

Egypt is optimistic about new gas discoveries in the Mediterranean

african inspired, BUSINESS, News, Newspaper, NIGERIA, Nigerian News, Nigerian state programs, wazobia companies
FIVE years ago the country that hopes to become a Mediterranean energy hub couldn’t even keep the lights on. When Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi took power in a coup in July 2013, Egypt was plagued by blackouts. Factories shut down. Surgeons operated by torchlight. Egypt’s energy supply is still spotty. But on June 27th newspapers trumpeted the discovery of an enormous natural-gas field, called Noor, off the coast of North Sinai (see map). They billed it as the largest in the region. That title is already held by Egypt’s massive Zohr field, discovered in 2015, which is expected to change the country from a net importer to a net exporter of gas by next year. Much of the enthusiasm is premature. The Egyptian government has downplayed reports of the Noor field’s size. Eni, the Italian firm working

Golden Guinea releases year end results for 2018

BUSINESS
Golden Guinea Breweries Plc, earlier on Thursday released its full year statement of affairs for the year ending 31 March 2018. The Umuahia-based brewer which has not been active for 15 years following a fire outbreak at its facility in 2003 said in its report that it has not resumed its principal activities of brewing during the year under review as a result of the ongoing reactivation activities. The company further said that “positive efforts and active steps are being taken to recapitalize and resuscitate the company. “Rehabilitation and retooling works at the brewery are at final stages of commissioning as at June 2018. Also, positive results are being achieved in sourcing the funds and working capital required to resume operations within the next few months.” The company listed Total